Formnext 2019: moi composites to Make Waves with 3D Printed Trimaran

3D printing continues to offer major impacts to the marine industry, as will be evidenced by moi composites at Formnext in Frankfurt, running from November 19-22. The European tech start-up will display MAMBO, the 3D printed motor additive manufacturing boat, at the Autodesk booth.

The 22-foot 3D printed trimaran is the result of a collaboration with a number of industrial leaders, to include:

  • Autodesk
  • Owens Corning
  • Catmarine
  • Osculati
  • Micad
  • UCINA

While 3D printing is enticing to industrial manufacturers due to greater affordability, speed in production, and the ability to create new components altogether, Project MAMBO shows the possibilities ahead for both 3D printing and smart manufacturing. For industries like marine or automotive, 3D printing also offers manufacturers the incredible benefit of being able to recreate obsolete objects, rather than attempting to find them in a different area of the world or from a company that may not be able to ship them out expediently.

For this design, however, the moi composites team created a unique, wavy shape that would have been impossible to produce through conventional methods such as hand lamination, automated tape laying, fiber placement, or filament winding production. On finalization, the design team expects the MAMBO to weigh in around 1,760 pounds. While you can take a look at it during Formnext next week, the 3D printed boat will be on display around the world in the coming months.

Founded in 2018, moi composites is an Italian company relying on continuous fiber manufacturing (CFM) to create strong, customized parts that are also lighter in weight for applications requiring both high performance and durability. In working with customers, they help them to imagine the concepts they need, in composite material, customize it for their uses, and in many cases create completely novel parts. They offer research, design, and development—working with customers from the idea stage to end production—often making use of both more progressive digital manufacturing and conventional methods.

“Moi provides people with the freedom to create products in unimaginable shapes and hyper performances, what they need when they need it, to redefine composite manufacturing,” states the company in their latest press release sent to 3DPrint.com.

We have seen many and varied projects within the marine industry, connected with 3D design and 3D printing—from international collaborations between companies to fabricate innovative propellers, bring forth on-demand products as the worldwide need and trend for such activity continues to increase, print parts for competitive sailing on numerous counts, and so much more.

What do you think of this 3D printing news? Let us know your thoughts on the subject! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: moi composites]

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